Fellows Detail

Professor Michael Innes

MA (Aberdeen), PhD (Birmingham)

Elected: 1997

Discipline: Psychology

Specialisation: Political psychology, attitudes, film, media psychology,cybersociety, evaluation

Profile

Professor Michael Innes is currently in the School of Psychology in the Australian College of Applied Psychology, based in Sydney. He was until 2009 inaugural Pro-Vice Chancellor of the Murdoch University International Studies Centre based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. He was previously Executive Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Adelaide and a Visiting Research Professor with the Interactive Television Research institute, Murdoch University, Western Australia. Trained as a psychologist he specialises in social and political psychology, especially the psychology of values and attitudes. Other areas of interest include:

  • methodology of program evaluation
  • influences of film
  • value influence on social psychological inquiry.

Appointments

  • Member, National Committee of Psychology of Australian Academy of Science
  • Member of Humanities and Social Sciences Panel of Australian Research Council, 1992-95
  • Chair of the Division of Research and Teaching of the Australian Psychological Society, 1999-2001
  • Director of Science of Australian Psychological Society 2000-2001.

Awards

Memberships / Fellowships

  • Fellow of the British Psychological Society
  • Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society
  • Fellow of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology
  • Fellow of the Association of Psychological Sciences

Publications

  • S. Stevenson, G.Hall and J M Innes (2003) Sociomoral reasoning and criminal sentiments in Australian men and women violent offenders and non-offenders., International Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1(1): 111-119.
  • J M Innes (2001) Behaviour in groups, In Psychological science: An introduction. N. Bond and K. McConkey (eds.). Sydney: McGraw-Hill.
  • J M Innes (2001) Values, attitudes and beliefs, In Psychological science: An introduction. N. Bond and K. McConkey (eds.). Sydney: McGraw-Hill.
  • S. Hodgkinson and J M Innes (2000) The prediction of ecological and environmental belief systems, Journal of Environmental Psychology, 20:285-294.
  • J M Innes and D Siddle (1998) Values and attitudes, In Challenges for the Social Sciences and Australia, Volume 2. (eds.). Canberra, ACT: National Board of Employment, Education and Training.

Contact

Email: consultancycam [at] gmail.com
Mobile: 0423 322 811

Contact Information

Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

    ABN: 59 957 839 703
  • Location: 26 Balmain Crescent, Acton, ACT 2601
  • Postal: GPO Box 1956, Canberra, ACT 2601
  • +61 .2 62491788
  • +61 .2 62474335
  • secretariat@assa.edu.au