Fellows Detail

Professor Philip Mitchell AM

MB BS (Hons) (USyd), MD (UNSW)

Elected: 2015

Discipline: Social Medicine

Specialisation: Psychiatry, bipolar disorder, depression, high risk, genetics

Profile

Scientia Professor PHILIP MITCHELL AM is Head of the School of Psychiatry at The University of New South Wales. Professor Mitchell specialises in bipolar disorder and depression. His current focus is on identifying biological and clinical factors that increase the risk of at-risk subjects developing bipolar disorder, with the ultimate aim of enabling the development of targeted early intervention programs.

Key appointments in last 10 years: Chair, NSW Mental Health Priority Taskforce; Member, NHMRC Research Committee; Vice-President (Governance) International Society for Bipolar Disorders.

Appointments

Vice-President (Governance), International Society for Bipolar Disorders

Director/Board Member, Black Dog Institute

Director/Board Member, The Anika Foundation for Adolescent Depression and Suicide

Convenor, Australasian Society for Bipolar and Depressive Disorders

Awards

FRANZCP, FRCPsych

Senior Research Award, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (2002)

Founders Medal, Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research (2004)

NSW Medical/Media Award, Research Australia (2006)

Vocational Excellence Award, Rotary International (2008)

Samuel Novey Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences (2008)

Member of the Order of Australia (2010) for service to medical education, particularly in the field of psychiatry, as an academic, researcher and practitioner, through contributions to the understanding, treatment and prevention of mental illnesses.

College Citation, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (2013) for exceptional service to psychiatry.

Publications

Breakspear, M., Roberts, G., Green, M. J., Nguyen, V. T., Frankland, A., Levy, F., Lenroot, R., Mitchell, P. B. (2015) Network dysfunction of emotional and cognitive processes in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder. Brain (E-publication 15th September 2015 doi: 10.1093/brain/awv261).

Fullerton, J. M., Koller, D. L., Edenberg, H. J.,Foroud, T., Liu, H., Glowinski, A. L., McInnis, M., Wilcox, H., Frankland, A., Roberts, G., Schofield, P. R., Mitchell, P. B., Nurnberger, J. I., and Bipolar High Risk Study Group, BiGS Consortium. (2015). Assessment of first and second degree relatives of individuals with bipolar disorder shows increased genetic risk scores in both affected relatives and young at-risk individuals. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric 168(7): 617-29.

Mitchell, P.B. (2015) Bipolar disorder and anxiety: a comorbidity needing better treatments.  Lancet Psychiatry 2 (8): 671-672.

Perich, T., Lau, P., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., Roberts, G., Frankland, A., Wright, A., Green, M., Breakspear, M., Corry, J., Radlinska, B., McCormack, C., Joslyn, C., Levy, F., Lenroot, R., Nurnberger, J.I., Mitchell, P. B. (2015) What clinical features precede the onset of bipolar disorder? Journal of Psychiatric Research 62: 71-77.

Frankland, A., Albaigès, E. C., Hadzi-Pavlovic,D., Roberts., G , Wright, A., Loo, C.K., Breakspear, M., Mitchell, P. B. (2015)  Comparing the phenomenology of depressive episodes in bipolar I and II disorder and major depressive disorder within bipolar disorder pedigrees. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 76 (1): 32-39.
 

Contact

Email: phil.mitchell [at] unsw.edu.au

Contact Information

Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

    ABN: 59 957 839 703
  • Location: 26 Balmain Crescent, Acton, ACT 2601
  • Postal: GPO Box 1956, Canberra, ACT 2601
  • +61 .2 62491788
  • +61 .2 62474335
  • secretariat@assa.edu.au