Fellows' featured books and articles

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Battlers and Billionaires

Is Australia fair enough? And why does inequality matter anyway? In Battlers and Billionaires, Andrew Leigh weaves together vivid stories, interesting history and powerful statistics to tell the story of inequality in this country.  This is economics writing at its best. From egalitarian beginnings, Australian inequality rose through the nineteenth century.  Then we became more […]

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The Reef – A Passionate History

The Great Barrier Reef, argues Iain McCalman, has been created by human minds as well as coral polyps, by imaginations as well as natural processes. In this landmark book he charts our shifting perceptions of it, from the terrifying labyrinth that almost sunk Cook’s Endeavour to a fragile global treasure. The Reef describes twelve key […]

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Australian Wage Policy

The advent of industrial regulation by tribunal came close to the turn of the century. Wages boards began in Victoria in 1896 and courts of arbitration in 1900. The first day of the new century was also the first day of the Commonwealth of Australia, endowed with a Parliament that was empowered to institute its […]

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Understanding and Preventing Corruption

This readily accessible guide addresses key issues in the international problem of public and private sector corruption. Despite the growth in interest of corruption in government and politics, few studies have focused on the practical questions of how to combat corruption. Graycar and Prenzler address these deficits by connecting analyses about the nature and causes […]

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Educational Research and Professional Learning in Changing Times

Educational Research and Professional Learning in Changing Times reports three dimensions of a longitudinal Australian study with the ultimate aim of improving the mathematics learning outcomes for all middle school students in preparation for the quantitative literacy requirements of the 21st century. It was also hoped to improve the prospects for students with the interest […]

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Reinvention

Ours is the era of ‘reinvention’. From psychotherapy to life coaching, from self-help manuals to cosmetic surgery, and from corporate rebranding to urban redesign: the art of reinvention is inextricably interwoven with the lure of the next frontier, the breakthrough to the next boundary – especially boundaries of the self. In this insightful and provocative […]

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Global Finance After the Crisis

‘The interplay between the macro-economic imbalances, notably in the relationship between the USA and China, and the more micro-economic shortcomings of the West’s financial systems, particularly the lax regulation, forms the centre-piece of this excellently written book. In the disputes about the relative culpability of China and the USA for current macro-economic problems, they tend […]

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Weight of Modernity

Over a half of adults in the US, Canada, Australia and numerous European countries are now overweight or obese, a proportion that has risen sharply in the past two decades. Dominant biomedical explanations focus on the energy equation – an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure – and remedies focus on motivating individuals to restore […]

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Building age-friendly communities

Hal Kendig with Chris Phillipson (Manchester) published a chapter on age-friendly cities in a British Academy of Social Sciences and Humanities report on local action to reduce health inequalities released January 2014.

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The age of migration

The fifth edition of the book ‘The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World’ by Stephen Castles FASSA, Research Professor of Sociology at the University of Sydney,  with Hein de Haas of Oxford University and Mark J. Miller of Delaware University has just been published by Palgrave-Macmillan in the UK and Guilford […]

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Jon Altman: Arguing the Intervention

For over three decades, Professor Jon Altman has been one of the leading scholars on Indigenous research with a particular focus on Indigenous economies. Through the period since the Northern Territory intervention in 2007 until the present day, his work has taken on increasing significance. In this collection of essays published in The Journal of […]

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Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations

Proletarian and Gendered Mass Migrations connects the 19th- and 20th-century labor migrations and migration systems in global transcultural perspective. It emphasizes macro-regional internal continuities or discontinuities and interactions between and within macro-regions. The essays look at migrant workers experiences in constraining frames and the options they seize or constraints they circumvent. It traces the development […]

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Arresting incarceration

[Weatherburn] was frustrated at the failure to reduce Aboriginal deaths in custody after the royal commission into the issue, angry that the subject had disappeared from the news even as rates of Aboriginal imprisonment per head of population continued to rise and disappointed with the scholarly debate about its causes. ‘People had started out with […]

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The politics of accountability in Southeast Asia

This book is the first large-scale academic study of accountability politics in Southeast Asia, Innovative introduction of the concept of moral ideologies of accountability, compares democratic and nondemocratic ideologies of accountability and involves studies across seven Southeast Asian countries The book offers a different perspective, investigating the crucial role of contrasting ideologies informing accountability movements […]

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Measuring and Promoting Wellbeing

Australia continues to be at the forefront of international work on measuring and promoting wellbeing, Ian Castles being a significant contributor over the last forty years as an official and academic. This book combines a selection of Castles’ important work with contemporary research from a range of contributors.

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America Inc.?

The book traces the U.S. capacity for transformative innovation to the strength of its national security state, a complex of agencies, programs, and hybrid arrangements that has developed around the institution of permanent defence preparedness and the pursuit of technological supremacy.

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Managing fear

Managing Fear examines the growing use of risk assessment as it relates to preventive detention and supervision schemes for offenders perceived to be at a high risk of re-offending, individuals with severe mental illness, and suspected terrorists. It outlines a number of legislative regimes in common law countries that have broadened ‘civil’ (as opposed to […]

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Individual Rights and the Making of the International System

We live today in the first global system of sovereign states in history, encompassing all of the world’s polities, peoples, religions and civilizations. Christian Reus-Smit presents a new account of how this system came to be, one in which struggles for individual rights play a central role. The international system expanded from its original European […]

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Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

    ABN: 59 957 839 703
  • Location: 26 Balmain Crescent, Acton, ACT 2601
  • Postal: GPO Box 1956, Canberra, ACT 2601
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